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How To Manage Electric Scooters In Cities

C-STAR Industrial Limited | Updated: Jan 11, 2019

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Bird and Lime are the two largest scooter operators who both launched a shared electric scooter business in Atlanta in early 2018. Nowadays, electric scooters can be seen walking through streets and sidewalks. Many people say that electric scooters have invaded Atlanta. But according to its urbanists, “invasion” is a positive development of the city's transition from car-centric to scooter, bicycle, moped and other diverse modes of transportation.


As the urban population increases rapidly, people need to choose to travel. More people using motorcycles, bicycles, and modes other than cars can spur the city to design safer streets for all users, allowing people to pay more attention to Atlanta's streets and sidewalks. As the Atlanta City Management official said, “We should accept this and determine how best to regulate it. This may be a very good thing for our city.”


Even so, the widespread use of scooters has created many new problems. For example, the ubiquitous electric scooter has affected the smooth progress of wheelchairs for the disabled. In some parts of Atlanta, traffic problems are caused by excess scooters. Although there is no statistical data in the emergency department of the Atlanta Medical Center, it is often seen that the trauma caused by the electric scooter is also severely wounded by a car or motorcycle accident. The scooter company told the drivers to wear helmets, but they would not be punished if they didn't wear them. An epidemiological study of electric scooters in Texas shows that scooter injuries are related to gravel roads, riding speeds, downhill roads, and what type of shoes the cyclist wears.


In addition, public health officials and legislators are critical in how to regulate management, which can help scooters improve the scooter itself and how it operates to make it safer. The Atlanta City Council is expected to vote on scooter regulations in January.